Sun masks - the latest beach wear trend?

August 27th, 2012
By

I've turned into one of those Asian ladies who wear long, white gloves and carry an umbrella while in the sun. Laugh if you will, and I know you will because all my friends have, but I have finally become sensible about skin.

We all know the cumulative effects of sun exposure put us at higher risk of cellular damage: early wrinkling, age spots, actinic keratoses, and skin cancer -- including melanoma, the most serious type. A few months ago, I bought white gloves that go up to the elbow and I keep it in the car for driving.

Sometimes I don't put the right-side glove on because it interferes with the touch screen dashboard. On a quick errand, I got lazy and left the left-side glove on and got out. My acquaintance whom I was dropping something off with thought I had some medical issue or an ugly scar I was hiding. I laughed and explained it was just for sun shielding.

Olivia is always covetous of the fancy, princess-like glove, and asks if we can share. Claus' reaction is totally the opposite, and he always snickers at me.

Naturally, you can extrapolate that I try to avoid the beach or pool at high noon, and when I do go, I'm covered in a long-sleeved rash guard, sunglasses, sunblock, hat, and long surf shorts. If I could wear a burquini and not totally stand out, I would.

Therefore, when I read about the latest trend in sun protection, I enjoyed finding solidarity with women a continent away. Chinese women are wearing sun masks! It looks like a ski mask, but of thinner material. It's totally freaky looking, but I'm sure it's to prevent one from becoming... totally freaking looking later.

How long do you think until this trend hits Hawaii shores?

10 Responses to “Sun masks - the latest beach wear trend?”

  1. DIO:

    If this ever happens, businesses are going to start to put up signs asking customers to please remove their "sun protection" upon entering, lest they be mistaken for criminals about to rob the place. Is there a reason for the sun mask that can't be addressed with an umbrella?


  2. Ken Conklin:

    The women in China are not wearing sun masks because they fear melanoma. The masks are to prevent their skin from getting a tan, because women in China regard pale porcelain skin to be beautiful and a sign of high status. Low-class farm field workers get leathery brown skin because they're in the sun all day, while high-class women married to wealthy men stay indoors and therefore their skin stays soft and pale. I've noticed that Asian women working as TV in-studio news readers or weather ladies often change skin color depending on studio lighting; and although I prefer cinnamon shades they (or their directors) seem to prefer porcelain.


  3. galekaminari:

    I have nothing against sun masks except the DIO comment, which is probably true! However, you should know that Vitamin D, which your body makes naturally from sun exposure, is pretty important. That being said, D3 supplements can be bought and taken. I don't know how good they are, having decided that I prefer to make my own via some sun exposure.

    After seeing elderly asian women who stay the same size and protect their skin from sun exposure, I can attest that their skin looks quite young into old age. By the time I discovered that, I was long past the sun days of my youth. Sun damage aside, I sure enjoyed hanging out at the beach and playing in the ocean all day long on weekends. My mother did warn me, but being a teen, I did not listen. I told her that it was her responsibility to advise and my responsibility to choose my path. While I was earnest, my mom probably wanted to smack her forehead--it probably came across as borderline snarky. These days, one can use a great zinc sunblock and get the best of both worlds. Back in my day, sunscreen was just being tested. However, I don't regret my choice and would do the same all over again.


  4. Chicken Grease:

    Sun masks - the latest beach wear trend?

    August 27th, 2012
    By Diane Ako

    . . . How long do you think until this trend hits Hawaii shores?

    Will probably not hit. Ah, Diane, you're quite fashionable on TV . . . please reconsider this new wear of yours (ehy, get sunscreen Long's, sistah!). Methinks Hawaii folks can count themselves among those "beach peoples" who have an innate ability to easily gauge how long they should stay on the sun.

    With regard to the clothing trend? Heck, we've seen ladies from Japan sport those Popeye Doyle porkpie hats and/or prohibition-era flat-brimmed straw hats along w/a muumuu of their choice, as a recent trend of theirs, for a few years now and, quite frankly, I have not seen a single local woman wear that same early ideas from the wardrobe department from Escape From LA.

    I suppose if it's not from a surf shop or aloha shirt store or line, we Hawaii folks don't need fashion trends, no matter the reason ;). Might have to do with how we don't need to change type of clothes as the seasons change . . .


  5. Chicken Grease:

    Methinks Hawaii folks can count themselves among those "beach peoples" who have an innate ability to easily gauge how long they should stay on the sun

    Um, of course, the above SHOULD have read in the sun and not "on". If we had the problem of being "on" the sun, well, heh, feggit about it, heh.


  6. DIO:

    Don't worry Chicken Grease, being "on the sun" is fine, as long as you're there only at night. ;-) :lol:


  7. Keoni Simpkins:

    Eh DIO, you wouldn't happen to be blond would you? :shock: :lol:


  8. DIO:

    Eh Keoni, I jus' learn from K.K. Kaumanua and da Kaumanua Space Program. Go check 'um out on Youtube, you understand. ;-)


  9. M:

    They look like masked wrestlers... :lol:


  10. Chicken Grease:

    DIO:

    August 27th, 2012 at 8:16 pm

    Don't worry Chicken Grease, being "on the sun" is fine, as long as you're there only at night.

    Bwwhahaahahaaah!!! I always forget that one detail DIO, heh.


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