Spring break: Monterey Bay Aquarium

April 11th, 2014
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Monterey Bay Aquarium on Cannery Row in Monterey.

Monterey Bay Aquarium on Cannery Row in Monterey

Monterey Bay Aquarium is one of the nation's top family attractions, with one of the world's largest exhibit aquariums. It was a must-see on our family's trip itinerary!

Visitors enjoy the million-gallon Open Sea exhibit, featuring many returning visitor favorites. ©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

Visitors enjoy the million-gallon Open Sea exhibit, featuring many returning visitor favorites. ©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

The moment we walked in, it felt like we were swimming with the fishes due to the three-story aquarium with amazing views of sharks, sardines, and kelp-forest favorites. Our first stop was at the newly remodeled, million-gallon Open Sea exhibit, to watch a feeding of tuna, turtles, sharks, sardines and others.

Diver John talks to the audience during the daily fish feeding

Diver John talks to the audience during the daily fish feeding.

A friendly diver named John and a volunteer docent explained to the crowd for 15 minutes what we were seeing in this tank, as well as why each animal is important in the ocean's ecosystem. We learned about Monterey Bay's status as a marine protected area, how fish swim, and how the SCUBA equipment works; a well-rounded lecture for the many eager children sitting on the ground in front of the tank, as hungry for information as the fish were for the two-and-a-half pound of fish food John was doling out.

It was a great display, and I highly recommend you try to take in at least one daily show or feeding, as they're entertaining for both kids and adults. Show up a few minutes early to secure a seat or a spot on the floor.

Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris) named Rosa. © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris) named Rosa. © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

Another much anticipated exhibit was the southern sea otters, housed in a two story tank so you can look at them as they romp, tumble and wrestle above or in the water. The spirited sea otters are all rescued animals, no longer able to survive in the wild.

The big surprise for Olivia is that they are much larger than they seem like in photos- about five feet long and up to 70 pounds. The big surprise for me was that they were hunted to the brink of extinction for their pelts- sad.

Spotted jelly from“The Jellies Experience.” © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

Spotted jelly from“The Jellies Experience.” © Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

The Jellies is the exhibit that turned out to be my favorite. "Enter a far-out world where jellies dance, bloom and sting. These graceful and mysterious animals flaunt an array of fashions, from simple, see-through styles to vibrant colors with ruffles and beads. Some even glow when the light is just right," says the website. I could easily have sat there for an hour being mesmerized by their rhythmic movements and otherworldly glow.

More super cool looking jellies.

More super cool looking jellies.

More super cool looking jellies.

More super cool looking jellies. This photo is not upside down.

More super cool looking jellies.

More super cool looking jellies.

The Rocky Shore touch pool was fun, of course, but Olivia's favorite display was the Wave Crash gallery! We have not seen anything like that before, and all the little kids were delighted to stand under an acrylic tunnel and be "splashed" by a huge wave every half minute. The Wave Crash pumps about 600 gallons of water and "crashes" every 30 seconds. That's more than 500,000 gallons per eight-hour day.

Leopard sharks cruise a wetland pool in the Coastal Wetland to Sandy Shore exhibit in Ocean's Edge. ©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

Leopard sharks cruise a wetland pool in the Coastal Wetland to Sandy Shore exhibit in Ocean's Edge. ©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

It took us three hours to feel like we'd seen the majority of things, but if you really stopped to read each and every placard like my cousin Toni, it would take you double the time. It really is a great way to pass half a day or a whole day.

Anchovies swimming endlessly in a circle. Beautiful silver streaks.

Anchovies swimming endlessly in a circle. Beautiful silver streaks.

Founded in 1984, the mission of the non-profit Monterey Bay Aquarium is to protect ocean life for future generations by inspiring young and old with the beauty and wonder of the oceans. To that end, there is a heartbreaking display on how human carelessness kills marine life, helpful solutions as to what we can do about it now, and compelling reasons as to why you and I should care. If you'd like to support the aquarium or its conservation efforts, go to https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/support-us.

Penguin exhibit

Penguin exhibit

It's a beautifully designed aquarium and a place the entire family can enjoy. Don't miss it if you're in the area!

If you go:

Walking shoes are a must. Plan for three hours if possible so you can see it all without feeling rushed. Go early for street parking or find a nearby pay lot. More information at https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/visit.

 

4 Responses to “Spring break: Monterey Bay Aquarium”

  1. Big Island Lava:

    I went to visit Monterey Bay Aquarium and loved it. There was seahorse exhibit that I loved. Also the area has a historic value and it was nice checking all the surrounding shops and stores. There was a big tank that held some ahi that were over 300 pounds


  2. zzzzzz:

    Did you go on a week day? On weekends, there'd be a line of people waiting to get in, unlike what you first photo shows.


  3. Diane Ako:

    Yes it was a weekday.


  4. makaha wahine:

    Saw you on Hawaii 5 0 tonight!


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