Archive for December, 2015

Captain Hook

By
December 18th, 2015



We are now checking out guys together, my eight year old and me. We are addicted to Once Upon A Time, which is still on television, but we wait for the whole season to come out on Netflix then we binge watch.

It airs at night, after our bedtime. Well, after my bedtime. It's at 8 p.m. I told Olivia she could watch it without me, but in a move of loyalty, she said she'd only look at it with me.

Screen Shot 2015-11-27 at 3.18.48 PM

To tide us over until season five comes out, we're watching old shows. We have a crush on Captain Hook. Not the baby-faced actor who plays him, but the scruffy, leather-clad, eyeliner-wearing character. He's hot.

For the ladies, we both love Regina, but she chooses Queen Regina while I like Mayor Regina.

Anyway, there's one scene (season two) in which two protagonists have tied up the ethically-questionable Hook to a tree and are about to let the ogres eat him, asking aloud, "Why shouldn't we kill you?"

Olivia jumped in and said, "Because he's cute!"

I just about died. This kid is so funny.

We're telling this to our friend Kalei at dinner, when she demanded to see who the object of Olivia's affection is. Auntie Kalei is very protective about Olivia growing up.

We specified we like only the Hook guy, not the actual human without makeup and beard in a regular suit as seen in some Internet images. When he takes the guy liner off, it's over.

Kalei says, "Claus would look like that with eyeliner. Let's try. Hubby, can we put makeup on you?"

He stopped cooking and looked at us. He thinks we're crazy together. We are.

"Come on," she wheedled. "You have pretty eyes. You would look so good in eyeliner. It would bring out your eyes then you can look like the guy your wife and daughter have a crush on."

Maybe that did it. "Fine," he acquiesced.

We went to the bathroom and I kindly chose my liquid eyeliner instead of the pencil, figuring it would be softer and easier to apply. And still he complained it was uncomfortable! Wuss.

He even squeezed his eyes up after each brush stroke, thereby smudging the liner all over the lid. Lucky for him he's not a woman who needs to wear this.

When it was all done, we stepped back to assess. "His eyes look good," Kalei deemed. "Look how pretty his eyes are." They are hazel-greenish. Perhaps I should invest in dark green liner if this is going to be a habit.

"He still looks the same to me," I shrugged.

He walked out to the living room where Olivia was to show her the results so she could have a good laugh. He then went back to cooking, and I could have been a prankster and let him go off to dinner at our friend's house that way, but I was nice and reminded him to remove it.

"How do I take this off?" he asked.

"There's makeup remover and a cotton swab on the counter for you," I instructed.

When he emerged fresh-faced, I suggested he grow out the beard and try this again in a week to really see if he looks like Hook, but he declined. "I just tried makeup on and then used lady soap to get it off. I'm done here. Unless I'm going to get paid thousands of dollars per episode to do this again."

So, that's a no on the dark green liner?

 

Call out for help continues for former KHON2 newsman Kirk Matthews

By
December 16th, 2015



For more than three decades, Kirk Matthews appeared in Island homes every day, delivering the latest news in his authoritative yet warm style of reporting. In 2014, however, he retired from a long career at KHON2, with the idea of enjoying retirement with his wife Linda Coble - also an esteemed former newscaster.

Kirk and me

Kirk and me

 

Wife Linda and me

Wife Linda and me

He began his career in Oregon television and radio before moving to Hawaii in 1983. I distinctly remember watching Kirk on the news when I was growing up in Hawaii.

I joined the team at KHON2 in June 2014, and it was my privilege to cross work paths with Kirk for three months before he retired. Though we didn't know each other long, I was very fond of him, and we made a habit of hanging out and chatting for about ten minutes every day.

What was supposed to be a time of travel, golf, and karaoke has sadly become a fight for his life. This year, Kirk was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer.

In addition to the stress of the disease, the Matthews are under pressure from mounting medical bills. That's why his best friends got together to form Friends of Kirk, which, as a group, organized a fundraiser for Kirk.

Over the weekend, nearly 200 friends, relatives, and former colleagues attended a benefit at HASR Bistro in Chinatown to help raise money, and more importantly, to reconnect with their friend.

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"Words will never be able to express the mahalo, joy, and love we feel. Your remarkable dedication to the Friends fundraiser will be forever cherished. We feel as if we filled an enormous jar of support and aloha, capped it at the end of the event, and brought it home to keep for ever!!! We will imagine uncapping the jar and inhaling the love every day," Kirk and Linda said after the event.

If you want donate you can mail something to:

“Friends of Kirk”
P.O. Box 2449
Honolulu, HI 96804

Or, you can donate at any Bank of Hawaii location; be sure to mention “Friends of Kirk.”

Click here to see a video collage of Kirk's reporting:

http://khon2.com/2015/12/13/fundraising-event-draws-hundreds-to-help-retired-khon2-reporter-kirk-matthews/

Macerate

By
December 14th, 2015



I have a lovely friend from Tonga. She didn't come here until she was an adult, and while her conversational English is good, there are the occasional words that trip her up.

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She had kukui nuts she was using to apply oil to her grandbaby. I asked how, so she cracked a nut open for me and explained that you have to smash up the insides and squeeze the oil on a cloth. It's a very popular thing do to in Tonga, she says.

I had always thought the inside of the nut was a little like a coconut, where you have actual liquid sloshing around. I didn't realize you have to work for it.

IMG_9523

"So you have to macerate it," I confirmed.

"Yes, you have to mast___bate," she verified.

I stopped for a second, then I realized what I heard. "Oh. Um. It's maCERate," I corrected- not to be rude, but just wanting to prevent her from having a conversational faux-pas in the future.

Or maybe I shouldn't have corrected her and that would be one fun care home.

Six hours

By
December 11th, 2015



I've hit my mommy stride. I love having a daughter!!!

I had a haircut and an errand at the mall, and I asked Olivia if she wanted to come with me or stay with Daddy, and he'd probably take her to the pool.

"Mommy!" she declared.

"OK, but you have to bring a book so you won't be bored while I get my hair trimmed," I warned.

No problem. We left the house just before noon.

We arrived at Ala Moana Center early, so we decided to walk the new Ewa Wing for the first time. It was exciting. We enjoyed looking at the stores.

foil

It was then time for the salon. I thought she would be bored, but she ended up asking for highlights, and Ryan had time to take her, so I ended up waiting for her.

It was very Big Girl to have her hair foiled and washed in the sink. She was excited. She was most excited that this meant she didn't have to wash it at night.

Then, we continued strolling the mall, picking up gifts here and there, and getting my shampoo at Maile Organics (yummy!)

malie

Time flew. I haven't really been a shopper for years, but there was a time in college where I spent every weekend at Stanford Mall. If you know that mall, you know there's a lot of enticing things there.

As we drove home, Olivia exclaimed, "The sun is setting! The sky is pink! How long have we been out?? Daddy must be wondering where we are!"

Stuff we got

Some stuff we got

"Oh, I'm sure he knows where we are," I smirked. Though I rarely have the time or energy to shop now, when I get into a shopping center, I can get carried away. I'm sure he was relieved he wasn't with us. Actually, I like that he wasn't with us, pressuring us to leave.

Sidebar: funniest moment of the day was passing Victoria's Secret and seeing a solid wall of men sitting outside holding bags.

We had such an awesome day! It was so excellent to do this together!

We left after six hours, when we were starting to run out of steam, so I told her, "Hey, I still have to get more gifts. Tomorrow, let's go to --"

"No. I'm done. No more shopping," she stated flatly.

"What? Tomorrow's a new day! There's time to shop anew!" I insisted. "So, let's go to --"

"Nope," she cut me off again. "I can't even think about it. I'm so tired. I just want to get home and veg out."

And I had such high hopes for the apple not falling far from my tree. Ah, but there is so much more to learn, Grasshopper. Let Mommy show you the way.

Learn about Honokaa Town and Sugar Plantation Days

By
December 10th, 2015



"Honokaa Town: The Plantation Days," a free program and discussion about Honokaa Town and the sugar plantation days on the Island of Hawaii, will be presented at the Hawaii State Library on Saturday, December 12 at 11:45 a.m. in the First Floor Reading Room.  Laura Ruby and Ross Stephenson, co-authors of the newly-released book "Honokaa Town," will be the featured speakers.

Laura_Ruby

Like their previous presentations on "Honolulu Town" at the library, the authors will share historical photos and insightful commentary. Copies of the book will be available for purchase from the Friends of the Library of Hawaii following the presentation. Ruby is the editor of "Moiliili -The Life of a Community," the 2008 recipient of the Hawaii Individual Artist Fellowship (the highest honor in the visual arts), and the creator of "Site of Passage - Chinatown," a large commissioned site-specific sculpture.

Ross Stephenson. Courtesy: Ross Stephenson

Ross Stephenson. Courtesy: Ross Stephenson

Stephenson was the historian at the Hawaii State Historic Preservation Division of the Dept. of Land and Natural Resources, and the keeper of the Hawaii Register of Historic Places.

This one-hour program is suitable for ages 12 and older. Contact the library as soon as possible if a sign language interpreter or other special accommodation is needed. Hawaii State Library is located at 478 South King Street. For more information, please call the Library's Hawaii & Pacific Section at 808-586-3535.

 

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