Archive for February, 2016

Why you’ve never heard of Hilo’s Kalanakamaa gulch

By
February 17th, 2016



In 1880-1881, a lava flow from Mauna Loa came very close to entering Hilo Bay. In trying to reconstruct the timeline of this flow for a recent Volcano Awareness Month presentation, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory tracked down many old place names mentioned in newspaper reports of the lava’s progress. One such name that came up repeatedly is Kalanakamaa gulch (“Kahawai o Kalanakamaa”).

Before and after photos by Menzies Dickson of a Mauna Loa lava flow cascading into and ultimately filling a stream bed near Hilo in July 1881. Courtesy: National Park Service, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.

Before and after photos by Menzies Dickson of a Mauna Loa lava flow cascading into and ultimately filling a stream bed near Hilo in July 1881. Courtesy: National Park Service, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.

The first place researchers saw this name is the 1870's description of the boundary between the ahupuaʻa of Waiākea and Kūkūau The boundary goes mauka (inland) from the shoreline through several points within the Waiolama fishponds (area of today’s Hilo Bayfront soccer fields) to Kumu spring (just north of the downtown Longs Drugs). From there it continues upslope to Kalanakamaa across what is now Kīlauea Avenue. The record of this boundary was based on testimony by several kama‘āina (native-born residents) from the area.

An 1891 map of Hilo, produced by Surveyor E.D. Baldwin, is superimposed on a recent Google Earth image of the town to show the location of the Kalanakamaa gulch relative to the ‘Alenaio and Waiākea streams. The 1880-1881 Mauna Loa lava flow, shown in orange (lower left), reportedly diverted water from the Kalanakamaa gulch, which has since been filled in by construction and no longer exists.

An 1891 map of Hilo, produced by Surveyor E.D. Baldwin, is superimposed on a recent Google Earth image of the town to show the location of the Kalanakamaa gulch relative to the ‘Alenaio and Waiākea streams. The 1880-1881 Mauna Loa lava flow, shown in orange (lower left), reportedly diverted water from the Kalanakamaa gulch, which has since been filled in by construction and no longer exists.

In 1881, Joseph Nāwahī, a well-known Hilo lawyer, painter, and politician, wrote letters about the Mauna Loa flow to Hawaiian language newspapers. As the flow neared Hilo in June 1881, he described the lava descending into the Kaūmana stream and forecast that it would arrive on the Kalanakamaa gulch adjacent to Kūkūau Street in Hilo.

The Kalanakamaa place name appears several times in 1881, mostly in Hawaiian-language newspaper accounts of the Mauna Loa eruption. By the end of July, the lava flow was reported to be in Kalanakamaa gulch before it stalled in early August 1881.

The next time this place name is mentioned in detail is in testimony recorded by the Boundary Commission in 1900. The exact location of the boundary between the ahupuaʻa of Waiākea and Kūkūau was being disputed, and lawyers for both sides needed to clearly define each point in its description.

A typical example of a kama‘āina description of the boundary went like this: “… thence to Kumu, on the banks of the Waialama [Waiolama] river thence to Kalanakama [Kalanakamaa ]where the Government road to the volcano runs through the land thence to Huia ….”

One of the main questions the lawyers asked each witness was for the definition of Kalanakamaa. Was it a rock, a tree, a pile of rocks, a gulch?

The name literally means “remove sandals or shoes,” but many witnesses identified Kalanakamaa as a specific breadfruit tree at the intersection of a big gulch and the road to Volcano. Apparently, Hawaiians travelling from Puna to Hilo on this road wore ti-leaf sandals over the rough lava of Waiākea, but took them off and hung them in the breadfruit tree before going on to the soft ashy soil of Hilo.

It became apparent during the research that the Kalanakamaa name also applied to the adjacent gulch, which carried water when it rained, sometimes overflowing its banks. A bridge was built over the gulch prior to 1881, but it had washed away. All witnesses who described seeing water in the gulch said that it went dry after the “flow of ’81.”

An unnamed gulch in the area described by kama‘āina is shown on a map from the 1870s (available from Hawaii State Land Survey archives). In a 1954 aerial photo, a gulch in this same area is visible about 100 yards north of and parallel to Hualālai Street, from Kīlauea Avenue to the Police Department on Kapi‘olani Street. Researchers interpret these features to be the Kalanakamaa gulch. Dry since 1881 and largely filled in by subsequent construction, the gulch no longer exists.

From the research, scientists say it’s clear the 1880–1881 Mauna Loa lava flow significantly changed the way streams drained into Hilo Bay. Lava flowed down stream channels, filling some and diverting water into others, such as ‘Alenaio to the north of Kalanakamaa and Waiākea to the south.

This has happened repeatedly in the Hilo area. For example, there’s evidence of filling and diversion by lava flows along the Wailuku River, where the Boiling Pots area shows the remains of two such lava fillings in the past 10,000 years.

It’s not surprising if you’ve never heard of Kalanakamaa gulch. On a volcanic island such as ours, rivers and streams are temporary features that often change or vanish as lava flows alter the landscape.

Volcano Activity Updates
Kīlauea continues to erupt at its summit and East Rift Zone. During early February, the summit lava lake level was relatively stable, varying between about 36 and 38 m (118–125 ft) below the vent rim within Halema‘uma‘u Crater. On the East Rift Zone, scattered lava flow activity remains within about 6 km (4 mi) of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and is not currently threatening nearby communities.

Mauna Loa is not erupting. Seismicity remains elevated above long-term background levels. Continuously recording GPS instruments show deformation related to inflation of a magma reservoir beneath the summit and upper Southwest Rift Zone of Mauna Loa, with inflation recently occurring mainly in the southwestern part of the magma storage complex.

Visit the HVO website (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea daily eruption updates, Mauna Loa weekly updates, volcano photos, recent earthquakes info, and more; call for summary updates at 808-967-8862 (Kīlauea) or 808-967-8866 (Mauna Loa); email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

Hint not taken

By
February 15th, 2016



The worst hint taker in the world is my husband. If there is something I want, I can't hint. The only thing to do is tell.

Now, I'm Westernized, but still, there's a lingering Asian-ness that got handed down to me through my Chinese family. Asians don't say what they want. You have to intuit. So, while I don't do it myself, I recognize very subtle hints.

Example given: I worked at Sega. My uncle said, "Sega is nice." From that, I was supposed to figure out he wanted me to buy him games using my discount.

It was when he started acting all pissy with me a few visits later, and I asked my cousin what was up with that. "You're supposed to bring him a game cartridge," was the explanation.

So yes, around the Chinese, or at least the ones I know, you do have to be a mind reader.

I'm very American. I'm fourth generation American. I work in communications. I'm direct.

Five years ago, I remember telling my husband I would like to own jewelry with my birthstone, peridot. It doesn't have to be super expensive. I'm not that way.

In case you're about to make excuses for him, I did the following: I pointed out what peridot looks like, said it's the gemstone of my birth month, and said I like necklaces (17" chain in gold or silver), earrings (studs), and rings (size four or six.) If this isn't a hint, I don't know what is.

Then I waited. It can't be that hard. In five years, there have been 15 opportunities: five birthdays, five Christmases, and five Valentines Days.

I forgot about the peridot until we were at a store together recently, and studs were on sale. "I'd like these. You can buy me these for Valentine's, Hon."

peridot

He looked at me with his faux-quizzical-exasperated expression that says, "I got dragged around Macy's to look at women's dresses, makeup, purses, and jewelry, and now I have to buy something. Aren't I lucky."

Honestly, he's really nice. He will buy me what I want. Though, I don't want for much. I'm super low-maintenance.

"Do you remember I asked you for peridot jewelry five years ago?" I asked. I have never asked him for jewelry before, and we've been together for 15 years.

"What? Peri what?" he said.

That's OK. I accept this is the way it is. Next time I'll send him a printed request.

 

 

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How will you spend Valentine's Day?

By
February 12th, 2016



For years, my husband and I have spent Valentine's Day having dinner at home. He offers to take me out every year, and every year I say I prefer to avoid the crowds and do something simple at home.

He buys me flowers and chocolate. He likes to emulate gourmet meals, so he cooks up a fancy dinner for us and we relax at home.

How will you spend the day? Here's what some have to say:

Kurt Sukuzi, MLB Minnesota Twins catcher:

IMG_0149

"My wife (of nine years) and I will go to a spa resort in Palos Verdes and get a couples massage, have lunch near the water, and spend time alone. It's nice when you have kids. The kids will go to the babysitters and I'll spend quality time with my wife.

Jon Lovitz, Comedian/ actor:

IMG_0151

"Eating a big box of chocolate. I have a dog, Jerry. I'll probably share it with him. Wait, you can't give dogs chocolate, so I'll eat it by myself. He's my sweetheart."

Alan Wong, Restaurateur/ chef:

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"I'll be working! Every Valentine's Day!"

Ashley Lilinoe, Singer/ songwriter  - and an American Idol Farewell Season contestant:

IMG_0146

"It'll be just like any other day. I don't know! Do I have a boyfriend? I like to say I have a lover - and that lover is me."

Dr. Kalani Brady, KHON2's medical expert:

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"Hopefully dinner at Michele's with my honey (of 15 years), Jun. And I'll get her a lei."

Michael Colon-Yoshimoto, KHON2 photographer:

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"I'd like to do a shabu shabu date. Last year I planned that, got a set with all the food, the gas burner, the plates and utensils, and was about to set it up at a park - but then, there was a chance of rain that night! I was still going to go for it, but my family talked me out of it. My mom and sisters told me, 'She's dressed up! Take her out, she looks good!' So we went to Honolulu Night Market instead. This year I'm going to resurrect the shabu shabu idea! Now I'm thinking of asking her on a hike and having that waiting up top!"

Honolulu man places in top ten in global gelato competition

By
February 10th, 2016



You can find some of the best gelato in the world right here in Hawaii, and it's thanks to Dirk Koeppenkastrop, Ph.D., a maestro gelatiere and owner of a chain of IL Gelato stores on Oahu.

Team USA. Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Team USA. Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

For the fourth year in a row, Koeppenkastrop was selected to be on Team USA, which completed in the 2016 Gelato World Cup in Italy. He was the only Hawaii person on that team.

Team USA. Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Team USA. Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

This year, Koeppenkastrop chaired the team, in addition to contributing as its gelato maker. The team placed seventh overall; in separate events, it placed first in Ice Sculpture, and third place in "Mystery Box Challenge."

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

"It was a wonderful experience and this year we did really well. We were a little disappointed with the overall, as our goal was to be in the top five. However, looking at other nations' deliveries and considering that the USA has really no history in gelato making, to be one of the seven best teams in the world is quite an honor," he tells me. The winner of this year's championship was Italy, followed by Spain and Australia.

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

He explains more about the Mystery Box Challenge: "It's exactly like in those Iron Chef cooking duels. In the Mystery Box Challenge, each team gets to pull an unknown ingredient and has to make a gelato from scratch. The mystery box is one of the most challenging disciplines for the gelato maker and requires a high level of knowledge and experience, as the recipe has to be developed and the gelato made in a very short amount of time."

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

 

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

 

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

 

You can taste most of Team USA's World Cup flavors at IL Gelato Bar at the Kahala Mall and at IL Gelato Café at the North Shore Market Place in Haleiwa.

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

Courtesy: Carlota Caldeira

The Gelato World Championship is part of the International Exhibition of Artisan Gelato, Confectionery and Bakery Goods (SIGEP) in Rimini, Italy. The 7th edition of the Championships took place from January 22-25.

More at http://en.sigep.it; http://en.sigep.it/events/top-events/coppa-del-mondo-della-gelateria; www.GelatoTeamUSA.com.

Foul problem

By
February 8th, 2016



There is a rooster and a bunch of hens who have taken up residence outside my house. This is cute, but annoying when I'm trying to sleep.

I don't live in the country, but you know lots of the Hawaiians Islands have issues with feral foul. And they've made their way to our area. *sigh*

rooster

I don't know why this rooster doesn't crow at 3 a.m. when I could use the help with waking up, but he's completely silent at that time. So un-useful.

However, he's crowing like there is no tomorrow at 1 p.m. when I'm trying to take my nap. Sometimes, he's disrupting the hens who seem to like the side of the house, so there's a lot of clucking.

The crazy crowing happens on the fence outside my bedroom. The hen-ravaging takes place on the side of the house under my other bedroom window. I cannot win.

I'm so exhausted I usually end up falling asleep with the help of headphones and music. I don't notice him/ them as much after the nap because there are humans to pay attention to in the late afternoon.

Then, however, when I go to sleep at 6:30 p.m. he's usually back at it with the crowing or harassing of the females. He irritates more than just me.

rooster 2

The neighbor's dog, Bailey, has taken to barking at the chickens when they make too much noise. Bailey has the same noise threshold as I do.

Then, because Bailey is barking, my dog Inca starts barking, just to make sure she isn't missing out on something. Then there are two barking dogs and a cacophonous flock to suffer through. Hens can make really weird noises, did you know?

Now and then if the chickens aren't smart, they forget and wander over to Inca's side of the house, and then I hear giant thudding footsteps of a 70 pound dog, and a screaming bird running for her life.

It's funny, actually. Inca never catches the chicken but it's a lot of feathers and commotion.

The other day I made the mistake of trying to yell at the rooster to get it to shut up. When that didn't work I clapped my hands at it thinking I might sound like intimidating fireworks (I'm a fool), but I think he just thought I was applauding his vocal talents. He kept going, completely unfazed.

I gave up and went to sleep, but then I heard my husband walk outside and throw water at it. That did the trick. For that one moment.

So, I don't know. It's kind of a foul problem. I think they're cute when I'm awake but I do not appreciate them when I'm trying to not be awake.

My husband says roosters are supposed to crow at first light - and he should know because he, like I, has been an urban dweller all his life. Claus suggests the rooster has jet lag. Do we have an Eastern seaboard bird? Does it need melatonin to readjust?

I think I'm going to have to stalk him a little to see where he roosts and then wake HIM up in the middle of his night - which apparently is 3 a.m. - to see how he likes it.

Any suggestions for having them get the flock out of here?

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