Archive for the ‘Career’ Category

Alternate universe

July 6th, 2015
By



The other day, I was asked to work a day shift as a reporter. I looked forward to it.

It was really weird, though. In my business, the schedules are built around the shows, so you have morning shifters like me, and I work a 4 a.m. - noon. You have day shifters who do 10 - 6, and night shifters who do 3 -11 p.m.

I felt like I was in an alternate universe because the landscape was the same but the players were different. Who are these folks I never see at 8 a.m., in the newsroom after my morning show?

Crystal, Bridgette, Tasha, Terri

Crystal, Bridgette, Tasha, Terri

A group of us was chatting around the food counter after an ice cream break (I do love this place!) and I had to ask about some of the names they were talking about.

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Then, I walk into the studio to introduce my story on-air to the anchor and it's even more different. Do you realize the set lights are red in the morning and blue at night? It's a subtle difference on TV but in real life, I felt like I was in a whole different station.

Lanai

Sidebar: I did a story on how Lanai businesses need your help, and I am sympathetic. Go, if you have the wherewithal. The interconnectedness of life extends economically and we are all impacted in some way by a ripple effect. (Click here to watch.)

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I never get to see the evening anchors Joe, Howard, Marisa, and Kanoe all at the same time, and not at a station Christmas party!

By now I'm getting loopy from my body clock being thrown off so it started to feel like an out-of-body experience. Pleasant, but where am I?

I really liked connecting with co-workers in a different day part. I just wish I was more present to enjoy it!

This ever happen to you??

 

 

 

Pacific Century Fellows seeks 2015 - 2016 class of Island leaders

June 12th, 2015
By



One of the most amazing professional experiences I've had in my career was my year as a part of the Pacific Century Fellows (PCF). That's a group of mid-career leaders who are specifically selected for their potential and promise, who are groomed to help lead the state to prosperity.

PCF 2014 class. Courtesy: Ryan Kawamoto.

PCF 2014 class. Courtesy: Ryan Kawamoto.

"The objective of the Pacific Century Fellows Program is to develop leaders with a greater awareness and sensitivity to the people and institutions of Hawaii. Based on the White House Fellows Program, the Pacific Century Fellows Program will bring together annually up to 32 of Hawaii’s most promising individuals from all walks of life, fields and professions. They’ll gain a broader view of civic duty through direct contact with senior community, social and government leaders. The program encourages the development of long-term relationships between leaders young and old, united in their commitment to find creative solutions to the challenges facing the state," reads the PCF website.

Diane and Mufi

Diane and Mufi

Founder Mufi Hannemann designed it as a nine month program that starts with a mandatory two day retreat. Thereafter, fellows meet monthly for an all-day seminar that focuses on one specific topic of our community.

Touring Institute for Human Services

Touring Institute for Human Services

As part of the most recent class (2014), for instance, I spent a day touring homeless encampments, getting a look at how the Institute for Human Services is set up, and hearing from developers about proposed solutions to the affordable housing crisis. It's meant to open your mind to the larger perspective, so that when you return to your job, you will consider how you can affect change.

Matthew Bauer and Kaiwi  Yoon

Matthew Bauer and Kaiwi Yoon

Alumnus Matthew Bauer had a similar realization. "The Pacific Century Fellowship allows participants the opportunity to look at the many issues facing the state from different view points.  My eyes were open on many topics I thought I had an understanding on including: GMO use, public education, the military and the criminal justice system. It was when PCF was touring Halawa Prison, our class' first seminar, that I realized to gain greater understanding you really need to dig deep and understand the issue on the ground level," he says.

Hawaii Island resident Ryan Kadota says it was worth the extra effort to be part of this. "Coming from a neighbor island, I was afforded the opportunity to bring a different outlook to our monthly outings and share that with my classmates, as well as gain their perspectives. There was a lot we all learned from one another. The most rewarding part of the Pacific Century Fellows, besides my own personal growth, are friendships I formed over the course of the program."

Ryan Kadota and me

Ryan Kadota and me

The program's end is really just the beginning of our commitment to greater community responsibility. We are expected to take a more active public service role, applying the concepts learned over the course of the program.

There are many reasons I enjoyed this experience so much, but one of them is the deeper engagement with society that it afforded. Though I've spent most of my career in journalism, which puts me in touch with a wide slice of life, I've rarely been able to dedicate an entire day of study to an issue. Also, people are less willing to speak openly about their real feelings to a reporter.

Hike at Mt. Ka`ala

Hike at Mt. Ka`ala

I do believe we're only as strong as our weakest link, and I appreciate that the program empowers me to now act upon the urge to help. It also provides me a built-in network of like-minded people, creating a synergistic effect.

As a bonus, the classes usually bond, and many, like ours, create opportunities on their own for trips and monthly lunches. I have 30 amazing new friends who I connect with in a way that I haven't replicated elsewhere.

Kalawao

Kalawao, Moloka`i

Kadota and I were part of two extracurricular trips, of which he reflects, "A very enlightening part of the program were the trips we took to the other neighbor islands, Moloka`i and Kaho`olawe, where we were able to learn about the history of those islands and their communities, as well as the monumental challenges facing them now and moving forward."

Optional PCF trip to Molokai. On the hike down to Kalaupapa. Courtesy: Ryan Kawamoto.

Optional PCF trip to Molokai. On the hike down to Kalaupapa. Courtesy: Ryan Kawamoto.

PCF is a bit like a college fraternity, but on the intellectual, professional, philanthropic side. I was not at all expecting that, based on my experience as a member or board director of other organizations, but I fully cherish it.

The boat to/ from Kaho`olawe

The boat to/ from Kaho`olawe

Do you want to be the change you want to see for Hawaii? PCF is taking applications for the Class of 2015-16 from now through July 15. More information at http://www.pacificcenturyfellows.com/. Good luck!

 

Working on Kaho`olawe

Working on Kaho`olawe

Joe Moore and Linda Purl star in "It's Only A Play" at Hawaii Theater

June 10th, 2015
By



First, let me say that my one year anniversary at KHON2 is coming up on June 23 and it's been a terrific time so far. Probably the most interesting perk of this job is that I now get to call our main anchor Joe Moore - sorry, let me rephrase that: THE JOE MOORE - my coworker.

15-2-5 Joe Moore

How awesome is that, right?! Like many of you who spent much of your lives in the Islands, I grew up watching Joe, and never thought one day we'd be on a first name basis.

Joe at KHON2

Joe at KHON2

I know I have worked in Hawaii news for a long time, so the possibility was higher than someone who didn't work in the media, but for some reason I still didn't think it a real possibility.

So here we are today, and Joe invited the newsroom to see his new play, It’s Only A Play, Terrence McNally’s uproarious comedy directed by Logan Reed. I'm planning to go!   Hawaii Theatre audiences will be the first in the country to see this play after it closed a box office record breaking run on Broadway June 7th.

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Joe obtained the performance rights from the playwright McNally after seeing the play in New York. "Mr. McNally was impressed by the level of talent our professional production will offer," said Joe, "and he loved the idea of it being a benefit for the historic and beautiful Hawaii Theatre. It's a real honor to be the first regional theatre in the nation to perform this hilarious comedy, especially having the rights granted personally by the four-time Tony winning playwright."

Joe, as he will look in the play. Courtesy: Joe Moore

Joe, as he will look in the play. Courtesy: Joe Moore

Joe, who's starred in several professional productions at Hawaii Theatre and always donates his fee to the theatre, will play former theatre actor turned TV star James Wicker; Broadway and TV star Linda Purl will play a clueless but kind producer. Purl is perhaps best known for portraying Ben Matlocks’ daughter Charlene in the TV series Matlock and was most recently seen as Pam Beesley’s Mother in The Office. Her many theatre credits include leading roles in The Year of Magical Thinking, A Streetcar Named Desire, A Glass Menagerie, Dinner with Friends, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Getting and Spending, and Romeo and Juliet.

Joe and Reed, a Broadway director who was personally recommended by playwright McNally, put together a stellar ensemble of actors who, in addition to Purl, include Po`okela Awards winners Cathy Foy, Tom Holowach, Paul Mitri, and Dezmond Gilla as well as Ryan Wuestewald, a former University of Hawaii theatre major who now acts in New York.

It's Only a Play is set in a Manhattan townhouse where Peter Austin (Paul Mitri) anxiously awaits to see if his new play is a hit. With his career on the line, he shares his opening night with his best friend and television star (Joe Moore), his fledgling producer (Linda Purl), his erratic leading lady (Cathy Foy), his wunderkind director (Ryan Wuestewald), an infamous drama critic (Tom Holowach), and a fresh-off-the-bus coat check attendant (Dezmond Gilla) who just arrived in New York. A show that is alternately raucous, ridiculous and tender — It’s Only a Play proves that sometimes the biggest laughs happen offstage.

Tickets are available starting at $22 and are available online at www.hawaiitheatre.com, by calling the Hawaii Theatre Box Office at 808-528-0506 or visiting the box office at 1130 Bethel Street, Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  For more information, visit www.hawaiitheatre.com.

Discounts for Hawaii Theatre members, groups of 10 or more, youth (18 and under), seniors (62 and older), and students and military (with valid ID). Some restrictions may apply.

This production is sponsored in part by Hawaiian Springs Natural Water and the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. It's Only A Play will have a limited engagement at Honolulu’s historic Hawaii Theatre for 11 shows only, June 18-28.

To see a PSA that KHON2 is running about this play, visit my Facebook page: Diane Ako.

At work with Mommy

April 17th, 2015
By



This is why my daughter likes coming to work with me. Here is a pictorial essay of a day we spent at KHON when there was no school due to a holiday.

We very quietly watch Uncle Taizo and Auntie Trini at work on Living 808.

We very quietly watch Uncle Taizo and Auntie Trini at work on Living 808.

We help greet the Living 808 guests.

We help greet the Living 808 guests.

After Mommy's work, we swing on banyan tree roots at Ala Moana Beach Park across KHON.

After Mommy's work, we swing on banyan tree roots at Ala Moana Beach Park across KHON.

We watch a boy catch tilapia and squeal when it comes too close.

We watch a boy catch tilapia and squeal when it comes too close.

We impress Mommy by getting easily across the monkey bars. Then again, someone is a little monkey.

We impress Mommy by getting easily across the monkey bars. Then again, someone is a little monkey.

Now that I think about it, this is why I like Olivia to visit me at work!

S & M and sewing

April 6th, 2015
By



As I mentioned in the previous blog, I committed to sewing Olivia curtains for her room, because she asked me to. I'm not a great seamstress, but I can do straight lines (somewhat!)

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One Saturday, my friend Kalei came over, so I asked her to help me with the curtains. She is about as undomesticated as they come (What's the opposite of that? Feral?) so she did the following whenever I asked for help:

-Take photos

-Need to respond to a text

-Need to post something work-related on Facebook

-Laugh at me

All this, while I slave over the sewing machine.

IMG_5889

Probably the funniest moment was when she said she couldn't help me because she had to look up the number for a sado masochist.

If needing to find a bondage professional has never come up in your casual conversations, this is how it sounds:

Me: "Can you hold the other end of this material so it doesn't move?"

Kalei: "Hang on. I just need to find the number for a dominatrix for an interview." <two text alert ringtones later> "Shoot. She can't go on air. Who was that other dominatrix? Think, think."

I should clarify, Kalei is a media person. The angle here was a tie-in to the 50 Shades of Grey phenomenon.

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So it goes on like this for many minutes and I, being a liberal media person as well, am also not fazed by the topic. It's just another conversation in my crazy household.

We debate why a professional dominatrix would not want to go on air to advertise her business (I mean, if this is her living, right?), we brainstorm other leads for S&M services, we discuss the attractiveness of the subject matter in general.

I have a lot of contacts in my address book but because I'm a news person, a lot of them are politicians, agency directors, and business executives. She's in music radio, so her sphere of influence is, well - alternative.

"You would make a good dominatrix," she muses. "You're bossy."

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FYI this is purely conjecture. S&M is not in my life experiences. Not that there's anything wrong with it!

This, because I've bossed her around (or tried to) all morning with the curtain sewing. She's one of my best friends and so it's easy to slip into the familiar / command form.

Like, thanks? I've never thought about that before?

She continued on. Continued! This is so bizzare! "I also can't see you as the subject. You're too strong willed. You'd be like, 'No. I don't feel like doing that. I'm not going to.'"

Truth be told, she's probably right. That sounds exactly like my personality. Bossy Chinese lady. Spun for political correctness: Confident career professional!

Here's what bossy Chinese lady did accomplish, though, while non-domesticated friend found a zillion ways to not have to help: I whipped up that set of curtains.